Tuesday Briefing: Trump can appear on ballots

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states may not bar Donald Trump from running for another presidential term, rejecting a challenge to his eligibility that had threatened to upend the race by taking him off ballots around the nation.

The case centered on a constitutional provision in the 14th Amendment, which was adopted after the Civil War in the 1860s, that prohibits insurrectionists from holding office. A challenge brought by voters in Colorado sought to disqualify Trump from the ballot for that state’s Republican primary based on the provision.

Though the justices provided different reasons, their decision was unanimous. None of them took a position on whether Trump had engaged in insurrection, and instead focused on legal issues. A five-justice majority said states could disqualify people from holding state office, but that only Congress was responsible for enforcing the provision in the 14th Amendment against federal officeholders and candidates.

In an interview on a conservative radio program, Trump said he was pleased by the ruling. “I was very honored by a nine-to-nothing vote,” he said. “And this is for future presidents, this is not for me.”

A big week in the presidential race: Today is Super Tuesday, when many states have primary elections. On Thursday, President Biden is scheduled to deliver his State of the Union address. Both the Trump and Biden campaigns see this as a critical period that will set the tone of the coming general election run.


France yesterday became the first country to explicitly enshrine access to abortion in its constitution. The amendment, prompted by the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in 2022, reflected the widespread support for abortion in France.

The amendment declared abortion a “guaranteed freedom.” That means future governments would not be able to “drastically modify” current laws, which fund abortions up to 14 weeks of pregnancy with no waiting period and without required counseling. Lawmakers voted 780-72 for the amendment.

“We are sending the message to all women: Your body belongs to you and no one has the right to control it in your stead,” Prime Minister Gabriel Attal said.

Politics: Unlike in the U.S., abortion is not a politically charged issue in France. Most people there believe abortion is a basic public health service and a woman’s right.


The report also said its team had heard allegations by Palestinian officials that implicated Israeli security forces and settlers in the assault of Palestinian women in detention and in the West Bank. The report called for a full investigation by U.N. officials.

In Washington, Vice President Kamala Harris is expected to press for a pause in fighting during a meeting with Benny Gantz, a top Israeli cabinet official.

Many Colombians call each other “sumercé,” a relic of colonial times meaning “your mercy.” They say the term signifies respect and affection, and that it has lost its hierarchical edge.

“At this point it marks no social class,” a Bogotá resident said. “We are all sumercé.”

Take a look at the picture above, taken by Atul Loke. He and Mujib Mashal, our South Asia bureau chief, traveled to Punjab to speak to girls about the country’s new cricket league for women. A career in sports is no longer just a pipe dream for these girls; it’s a chance at economic opportunity. Stardom.

They met Naina, 13, and her elder sister Sunaina, 14, pictured above. On their television is Harmanpreet Kaur, a Punjabi village girl like them who has made it big. The teenagers dream of playing cricket professionally and a family trophy case holds examples of their early triumphs. Naina, Sunaina and their teammates are still working on their skills, but a great air of confidence surrounds them.

For more: Read Mujib and Atul’s earlier piece on the cricket dreams of Punjabi village girls, written as the $500 million women’s cricket league got started.

Source link

Leave a Comment

Exit mobile version